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Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, Massachusetts

137 Warren Ave, Plymouth, Massachusetts

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Submitted by: Andy M.

Great place to visit with your family. Also a great place to get married, i was married in the hornblower garden, an...

Submitted by: Morgan W.

Plimoth Plantation is very popular with my kids, especially the Native American section, and they also really loved a sword fighting choreography demonstration we stumbled upon when we were there recently. For an adult, so...

Submitted by: Cristina P.

this place is amazing!  Our local library had a pass that saved us over 50% on the tickets.  They have an "orientation video" and then you walk over to a barn with goats etc. Then you head over to the Wampanoag home and see how these Native Americans lived.  Then you head to the English settlement wher...

Submitted by: Karen F.

A great place to take your family (get the combo ticket if you want to see the Mayflower II - because on its own the Mayflower II takes about 20 minutes to go through and is just not worth $10 admission). They take Triple A discounts. My little one (almost 7) liked the Nye Barn and the Craft Center best. They have 3 exten...

Submitted by: Ryan B.

Maybe I just came on a bad day, but my recent visit to the Plantation was miserable and underwhelming to say the least. I visited as a child, and decided to try this place out with my GF on a recent trip to New England.  I am glad we had free admission with our GoBoston cards, because it wouldn't have been worth any money. The Native American village is small with a couple tribal lodges.  The people who were there to represent the Wampanoag were depressing and dismissive.  We saw two woman holding a baby cooking some food, so I asked them what was in it and the response was 'Corn, strawberries, and stuff'  and then they turned around and just started talking to each other again.  One guy had a display of tri...

Submitted by: Linda M.

We enjoyed our visit to this living history museum. You'll find both a native and pilgrim village area where volunteers act out various roles and interact with patrons. They do a great job of giving both perspectives and trying to dispel the myths many of us learned years ago about what the 1st Thanksgiving might have been like. At the beginning you see a brief film and museum type display, then walk to villages and a craft shop. In the native village the staffers speak in English and answer questions from a modern day perspective. We saw them burning a log to create a canoe, making food and showing off games plus explaining about their garden, homes, animal furs and their uses. In the pilgrim village there ...

Submitted by: Kim E.

What an amazing treasure that this country has here. In school we only learn about the pilgrims and not much is said about the native Americans. Not here. The plantation is very balanced in giving both sides of the story. As...

Submitted by: KL O.

Oh man, it was a nightmare to get out there by commuter rail.  It was Monday, July 5 and everything was was still on holiday schedules.  We had to wait 2 hours to get on a train to Kingston (the closest stop near Plimouth) and then take a taxi to the Plantation (who tried to take us WAAAY out of the way... had I not seen the signs pointing the opposite direction to Plimouth, he would have detoured us through CT!).  Bottom line, if you are heading out there from Boston, rent a car... the cost of commuter rail, taxis to the plantation (the local commuter bus didn't run the day we were out there so we were stranded, a total nightmare) is going to be the same cost with a lot less stress. Once we got to the Plant...

Submitted by: Erin B.

Plimoth Plantation is more than just people dressed up like Pilgrims, the museum and shop both shouldn't be missed. The Pilgrim actors really reenact the period, as if instead of them being actors you are an interloper into their world via time machine.  There's a lot to be learned if you want to go prepared with questions or you can just listen to them talk and answer all of the others questions.  Engaging them really makes the experience, and it is fun to try and confuse them, but they are so practiced at it, they have their answers ready for the most part.  It really feels like stepping right back into their time. The Native people aren't actors, and this may confuse some people but I really liked that.  ...

Submitted by: Herman B.

At Plimoth Plantation, I toured re-creations of a Wampanoag village and a Colonial village.  I am proud to say that I was barked at by one person in each village.  A Native woman carrying an infant on her back barked at me for trying to take a picture from a good 20 feet away.  "I ALREADY TOLD PEOPLE NOT TO TAKE PICTURES OF THE CHILD."  Well, sorry ...

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